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Metaphorical Earbuds and Their Impact on Control, Inclusion and Loving thy Neighbor

The metaphorical earbuds we knowingly and unknowingly wear signifies many things. This includes desire for control, lack of inclusion and even weakness. Many world events shows how we often plug our ears, cover our eyes and hide from what we don’t want to face. It shows the ripple effect that happens when those earbuds or blinders are removed and we have no choice but to face reality.

The metaphorical earbuds we knowingly and unknowingly wear signifies a lot of things. Some of those qualities include the desire for control, a lack of inclusion and even weakness. I’m particularly reminded of this given that, as I write this post, I am watching the movie 42, about the astonishing opposition to Jackie Robinson joining the Major League Baseball roster of the Brooklyn Dodgers.  

The events of that season presented the many ways in which we plug our ears, cover our eyes and hide from what we don’t want to face. It shows the ripple effect that happens when those earbuds or blinders are removed and we have no choice but to face reality.

Presented here are seven posts that speaks to the flaws of our ways, the reasons we pursue those ways, and the need to overcome our own ignorances and biases.

We Wear Earbuds Because So We Can Feel In Control

Does Our Technology Feed Self-Centered Control? (Paul Tautges): Tautges shares some thoughts on Tim Challies’ book, The Next Story: Life and Faith after the Digital Explosion, specifically chapter five, which discusses “Life in the real world.”  In this post, he asks and ponders on eight “idol-shattering questions” concerning man’s need and desire for control.

Control Freak? (Jim Martin): Martin presents two types of controlling personalities. There is the stereotypical control freak. And then there’s what he calls the “benevolent controller.”  Then he ponders on the root of the need for control.

4 Theories of How a Leader Becomes Controlling (Ron Edmondson): Edmondson tackles the subject of controlling leaders. It stalls growth and destroys morale. A leader may not set out to be a controlling type. So, Edmondson asks, how do they get that way. Then, he shares four theories.

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We Remove Our Earbuds to Find a Sense of Inclusion

Drop “us vs. them” mentality (Nelson Searcy at Church Leader Insights): The fastest growing American religious group is those who claim no religious affiliation. They are the so-called “nones.” This post seeks to answer – to some degree – the question of why so many are walking away from church or are not willing to give it a chance.

Don’t Be Afraid To Take Your Kids With You (Kristen Welch at We Are That Family): Welch has such a great blog and offers a lot of great thoughts on life and parenting. This one, in particular, speaks to the need to expose your children to your work as you pursue your Godly calling. One great quote from this post…

Our kids don’t need our protection in the unknown half us much as they need to see us persevere in the known. Our kids don’t need our provision nearly as much as they need us to live with purpose.

The Earbuds We Wear Keep Our Neighbor’s At Arm’s Distance

Share This: How Jesus Saves From The Facebook Wars (Britney Lee at Red Letter Christians): If you are on Facebook even remotely with even just a few “friends” on your list, you no-doubt have seen how it can become a battleground of opinions. It can be distressing. As Lee shares “I am grieving today because I feel utterly disconnected from people I love and respect–or rather, people I loved and respected before the internet became a war zone.” She encourages us to set a tone of humanizing, inviting, and inspiring through our narratives – much in the way Jesus did.

We Can Differ, But We Can Also Be Kind (Mary DeMuth at ReStory): DeMuth shares a worry about those who have so sequestered themselves (put earbuds in place) that they can’t even read, hear or consider the perspectives of others without getting angry. She admits to having been that way to some extent earlier in her life, and later came to realize the personal weakness involved with such thinking.

About Chad Gramling

Chad Gramling makes his home in Indiana with his wife and three daughters. He's the founder and primary blogger at 1Glories, a vision cast onto his heart and detailed in Listen Up Kids: Foolish Dreams, Syncing with God & Running to Win.